Petrified of Street Photography? So am I!

by Mridula on October 2, 2013

in Canon D550,Nepal,Photography,Thailand

I am truly petrified of street photography. It feels like a daunting task to point my camera at a stranger’s face and click. I know, I know in India not too many people mind, but I just completely freeze most of the time. And yet I was fascinated by it too. I would keep reading tips after tips thinking something would unlock the secret for me. I am still uncomfortable with street photography but I have given it a try from time to time and here are the things that worked for me.

Miniature Apsaras, Siem Reap, Cambodia

Miniature Apsaras, Siem Reap, Cambodia

Shooting Things: Since I was petrified of shooting people I started with shooting things. Most of the times, the street vendors are fine even when you walk up close, exchange a glance towards their stuff and raise an eyebrow. They generally wave a hand to go ahead. I know this is not real street photography but I had to start somewhere. That is where I started and remained for a very long time.

I do remember one incident when I was framing a shot of vegetarian street food in Kuala Lumpur. I had clicked the shot but I was still looking through the viewfinder. I sensed someone walking into my frame and that startled me! He was the owner of the stall. I had ordered something with the young boy who was there. And while I was waiting for my mushrooms to arrive and clicking this man rudely walked into my frame. I did not understand the language but I guess the young boy told him I had already ordered. The burly man was now sort of apologetic. And that was the end of the incident. I guess sometimes it helps to buy something from a stall and then soot. But I can’t do this every time, more so when I don’t eat non-vegetarian food. A lot many owners are just fine if you are shooting their stuff. Sometimes the vendors even insist that I click there picture as well!

Too Difficult to Open: Using a Zoom Lens

Too Difficult to Open: Clicked Using a 75-300 Lens

Using a Zoom Lens: I know every self street respecting street photographer would advise you against it. But remember we are not dealing with self respecting street photographer but a terrified street photographer. I actually gathered courage only after I used a 75-300 to shoot people walking by at Phewa Lake in Pokhara, Nepal. I was sitting on a bench under shade as it was too hot. I saw boats coming and going as well as people walking by the lake. I decided to use the zoom. No one took any notice as I was a little away from the scene. It helped that I stationary as well. I liked what I clicked and this was the first time (June 2013) I thought I have to try it more.

Framing Wider

Wanted to Click the Man Under Umbrella Really

Framing Wider: So when I found myself in the colorful border market at Aranyaprathet (Thai-Cambodia border, September 2013) I wanted to do street photography. I was using a 50 mm (Canon) prime lens which would not let me zoom anything. I wanted to click the man under the umbrella but my nerves failed me as usual. I then decided to frame the scene wider. What to do, you have to think of ways to click things when you are scared of offending people.

Busy with Making a Dish, Aranyaprathet, Thai-Cambodia Border

Busy with Making a Dish, Aranyaprathet, Thai-Cambodia Border

Clicking Busy People: While walking through the Rong Kluea Market at the Thai-Cambodian border I realized that the vendors were so busy doing their business they hardly had any time for nosy photographer. Now that is a good thing for petrified novices like me. She never knew I clicked her picture.

Mom is Asleep, Rong Kluea Market, Thailand

Mom is Asleep, Rong Kluea Market, Thailand

Chancing upon Things: This mom and baby were resting in their shop when I chanced upon it. I think the mom knew I was clicking a picture but she didn’t stir beyond giving me a passing glance from beneath her hands. I was happy I mustered the courage to point my camera at them.

Taking Pictures from a Corner, Rong Kluea Border Market, Thailand

Taking Pictures from a Corner, Rong Kluea Border Market, Thailand

Positioning Myself in a Corner: But what has worked best for me is positioning myself in a corner of a busy street. That way I could watch the world go by and occasionally get a picture too. I must have clicked at least 30 pictures standing at this particular corner of Rong Kluea Border Market. Not one person stopped and asked me what did I think I was doing! A very happy scenario for me.

You can see more pictures from this market in another of my posts.

I know a purist reading this post would cringe. But what to do, I am just a petrified street photographer who is equally fascinated by it. I am trying hard to find my way around it.

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Related posts:

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  4. Braveheart Street Artist, Edinburgh, Scotland
  5. Street Game at Border Market, Aranyaprathet, Thailand

{ 24 comments… read them below or add one }

rupam { xhobdo } October 7, 2013 at 7:57 pm

So nice post, Beautiful photos

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sushmitha October 5, 2013 at 8:37 am

Lovely captures :)

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Ankita Sinha (@ankionthemove) October 3, 2013 at 11:19 pm

Wow great captures.I haven’t captured street yet,I am just too shy to ask people out.. :)

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Mridula October 4, 2013 at 12:11 pm

Thank you Ankita. I know to many street photography is a daunting task, I am one of them.

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Lady Fi October 3, 2013 at 5:35 pm

Good advice and great shots!

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Mridula October 3, 2013 at 10:37 pm

Thank you Lady Fi.

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Paresh Kale October 3, 2013 at 12:53 pm

A perfect series of clicks to describe everybody life !

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Mridula October 3, 2013 at 10:38 pm

Thank you Paresh.

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Anuradha Shankar October 3, 2013 at 12:43 pm

lovely photos, Mridula. i liked the one of the miniature apsaras the most.

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Mridula October 3, 2013 at 10:41 pm

Thank you Anu for a long time that was all I could click, things on display!

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meenamenon October 3, 2013 at 12:40 pm

Mother n daughter resting is my fav!

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Mridula October 3, 2013 at 10:43 pm

Thank you Meena, I somehow dared to click it.

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Mukulika October 3, 2013 at 10:00 am

Appreciate the way each photographs has its own story to tell, wonderfully written!

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Mridula October 3, 2013 at 10:43 pm

Thank you Mukulika.

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sangeeta October 3, 2013 at 9:49 am

Street photography is indeed an art to muster. I still remember how scared I was to even bring out my small digicam in a busy street to take pictures for work purpose. But your pictures are really amazing and speak volumes..

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Mridula October 3, 2013 at 10:44 pm

Sangeeta thank you. :D

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Harsha October 2, 2013 at 11:10 pm

I always loved capturing Streets,They are very colorful and I loved it.. :)

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Mridula October 3, 2013 at 10:44 pm

Thank you Harsha.

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amasc aka Anne October 2, 2013 at 9:10 pm

Oh my, how that resonates. I’ve adopted a new term, “street side photography” , to describe my cop out street photography where I stand by the road taking pictures of people on bikes and scooters.

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Mridula October 3, 2013 at 10:45 pm

Anne hopefully we get to progress from there!

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Niranjan October 2, 2013 at 8:42 pm

Street photography is something that am not very confident about. Things are easy to click, but people? Am not at all confident. Long shots are fine, but the closer ones are tough. Nice insights, Mridula.

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Mridula October 3, 2013 at 10:47 pm

Thank you Niranjan I am also almost in the same boat. Also I think Asia is easier for street photography.

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uma October 2, 2013 at 4:06 pm

An interesting post to read this morning. The miniature is lively! Keep writing :)

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Mridula October 3, 2013 at 10:47 pm

Thank you Uma.

Reply

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